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Hamlet Nekrasov
Hamlet Nekrasov

The Ultimate Guide to Nuke Studio: Features, Benefits, and Tips



The Foundry Nuke Studio90 V8rar: A Comprehensive Guide




If you are looking for a software that can help you create stunning visual effects and edit your videos like a pro, you might want to check out The Foundry Nuke Studio90 V8rar. This is a file name for a software product called Nuke Studio, which is one of the most powerful and versatile tools in the industry. In this article, we will explain what Nuke Studio is, what features and benefits it offers, how to download and install it, how to use it, and some tips and tricks for getting the most out of it.




The Foundry Nuke Studio90 V8rar



What is Nuke Studio?




Nuke Studio is a visual effects and film editing software developed by The Foundry, a company that specializes in creating software solutions for the media and entertainment industry. Nuke Studio is part of the Nuke family of products, which also includes NukeX, Nuke Indie, Hiero, HieroPlayer, and Cara VR.


Nuke Studio is a node-based compositing tool that allows artists to create complex and realistic visual effects for movies, TV shows, games, commercials, and other media projects. It also has a built-in timeline editor that lets you edit your footage, add transitions, audio tracks, color correction, and more. You can also use Nuke Studio to manage your projects from start to finish, with features like shot management, version control, review and approval tools, and delivery options.


The V8rar part of the file name indicates that it is a compressed file format that can be extracted using a program like WinRAR or 7-Zip. This means that you need to download the file and then extract it to access the installation files.


Features and Benefits of Nuke Studio




Nuke Studio offers many features and benefits that make it a preferred choice for many visual effects artists and editors. Here are some of them:


Post-production powerhouse




With Nuke Studio, you can handle any post-production challenge with ease. Whether you need to composite multiple layers of images, add 3D elements, track motion, rotoscope objects, key out green screens, apply filters and effects, or anything else you can think of, Nuke Studio has you covered. You can also use its powerful scripting capabilities to automate common tasks and procedures.


Nuke Studio also supports industry-standard file formats such as OpenEXR, DPX, TIFF, JPEG, PNG, MOV, MP4, WAV, AIFF, etc. You can also import footage from cameras like RED, ARRI Alexa, Sony F65/F55/F5/FS700 , Canon C300/C500, Blackmagic Cinema Camera, etc.


Nuke Studio also has a built-in timeline editor that lets you edit your footage, add transitions, audio tracks, color correction, and more. You can also use Nuke Studio to manage your projects from start to finish, with features like shot management, version control, review and approval tools, and delivery options.


Advanced compositing tools




Nuke Studio is a node-based compositing tool that allows you to create complex and realistic visual effects by connecting different nodes that perform different functions. Nodes are like building blocks that you can combine and customize to achieve the desired result. You can also group nodes into subgraphs and reuse them in other projects.


Nuke Studio has over 200 nodes that cover a wide range of compositing tasks, such as:


  • Transform: Scale, rotate, translate, warp, distort, and crop images.



  • Merge: Combine multiple images using different blending modes and operations.



  • Color: Adjust the color, brightness, contrast, saturation, hue, gamma, and exposure of images.



  • Filter: Apply various filters and effects to images, such as blur, sharpen, noise, glow, lens flare, etc.



  • Keyer: Extract foreground elements from background elements using different keying techniques, such as chroma key, luma key, difference key, etc.



  • Matte: Create and manipulate alpha channels and masks for images.



  • Tracker: Track the motion of objects and apply it to other elements.



  • Roto: Draw and animate shapes and curves to create masks and mattes.



  • Paint: Paint on images using different brushes and tools.



  • 3D: Import and export 3D geometry, cameras, lights, and shaders. Render 3D scenes using the Scanline or Raytrace renderers. Project 2D images onto 3D surfaces. Use the Deep compositing workflow to work with volumetric data.



  • Time: Change the speed, direction, duration, and frame rate of images. Retime images using optical flow or frame blending methods. Stabilize shaky footage. Add motion blur or motion vectors to images.



  • Warp: Bend and twist images using different warp modes and controls.



  • Multiview: Work with stereoscopic 3D footage and adjust the convergence, disparity, and alignment of the left and right views.



  • OCIO: Use the OpenColorIO color management system to ensure consistent color across different applications and devices.



Work with future-facing technology




Nuke Studio is constantly updated with new features and improvements that keep up with the latest trends and demands of the industry. Some of the recent additions include:


  • Cara VR: A suite of nodes that enable you to work with 360-degree video footage for virtual reality (VR) projects. You can stitch multiple cameras together, correct lens distortion, stabilize footage, track objects in 360 space, add 3D elements, apply effects, and more.



  • Cryptomatte: A node that automatically generates ID mattes for objects based on their names or other attributes. You can use Cryptomatte to isolate and modify specific elements in your scene without manually creating masks.



  • Smart Vector Toolset: A set of nodes that use optical flow analysis to track the movement of pixels in an image. You can use Smart Vectors to warp or distort one image based on another image's motion.



  • Kronos: A node that uses machine learning to retim e or reframe an image using neural networks. You can use Kronos to create slow-motion effects, change the aspect ratio, or remove unwanted objects from your footage.



  • Machine Learning Nodes: A collection of nodes that use machine learning models to perform various tasks, such as denoising, upscaling, face detection, face replacement, and more.



  • Hydra: A node that allows you to use the Hydra render delegate system to render 3D scenes using different renderers, such as Arnold, RenderMan, or USD Preview Surface.



Maximize your 3D workflow




Nuke Studio also has a robust 3D system that lets you import and export 3D geometry, cameras, lights, and shaders. You can also create 3D elements from scratch using Nuke Studio's built-in primitives, modifiers, and deformers. You can render your 3D scenes using the Scanline or Raytrace renderers, or use the Hydra node to use other renderers. You can also project 2D images onto 3D surfaces, or use the Deep compositing workflow to work with volumetric data.


Nuke Studio also supports industry-standard 3D formats such as Alembic, FBX, OBJ, USD, etc. You can also import and export 3D data from other applications such as Maya, Houdini, Blender, etc.


How to Download and Install Nuke Studio?




If you want to try Nuke Studio for yourself, you can download a free trial version from The Foundry's website. Here are the steps to download and install Nuke Studio:


System Requirements




Before you download Nuke Studio, make sure that your system meets the minimum requirements for running the software. Here are the system requirements for Nuke Studio:


Operating System


Processor


Memory


Graphics Card


Storage


Display


Windows 10 (64-bit)


Intel Core i7 or AMD Ryzen 7


32 GB RAM (64 GB recommended)


NVIDIA Quadro RTX 4000 or AMD Radeon Pro W5700 (8 GB VRAM)


1 TB SSD (2 TB recommended)


1920 x 1080 (4K recommended)


macOS 10.15 or later (64-bit)


Intel Core i9 or AMD Ryzen 9


32 GB RAM (64 GB recommended)


AMD Radeon Pro Vega II or NVIDIA GeForce RTX 2080 Ti (8 GB VRAM)


1 TB SSD (2 TB recommended)


1920 x 1080 (4K recommended)


Linux CentOS/RHEL 7.6 or later (64-bit)


Intel Core i7 or AMD Ryzen 7


32 GB RAM (64 GB recommended)


NVIDIA Quadro RTX 4000 or AMD Radeon Pro W5700 (8 GB VRAM)


1 TB SSD (2 TB recommended)


1920 x 1080 (4K recommended)


Download Links and Instructions




To download Nuke Studio, follow these steps:


  • Go to The Foundry's website and create an account or log in if you already have one.



  • Go to the Products page and select Nuke Studio.



  • Select the version and platform that you want to download.



  • Click on the Download button and save the file to your computer.



  • The file name should be something like The Foundry Nuke Studio90 V8rar.



  • This is a compressed file format that can be extracted using a program like WinRAR or 7-Zip.



  • To extract the file, right-click on it and select Extract Here or Extract to The Foundry Nuke Studio90 V8rar.This will create a folder with the installation files for Nuke Studio.



To install Nuke Studio, follow these steps:


  • Open the folder with the installation files and double-click on the setup.exe file (for Windows) or the install.sh file (for macOS or Linux).



  • Follow the instructions on the screen to complete the installation process.



  • You may need to enter your license key or activate your trial version during the installation.



  • Once the installation is done, you can launch Nuke Studio from your desktop or start menu.



How to Use Nuke Studio?




Now that you have downloaded and installed Nuke Studio, you are ready to start using it. Here are some basic concepts and terminology that you need to know before you begin:


Basic Concepts and Terminology




Nuke Studio is based on a node-based compositing system, which means that you create and edit your visual effects by connecting different nodes that perform different functions. Nodes are like building blocks that you can combine and customize to achieve the desired result. You can also group nodes into subgraphs and reuse them in other projects.


Nuke Studio also has a timeline editor, which allows you to edit your footage, add transitions, audio tracks, color correction, and more. You can also use the timeline editor to manage your projects from start to finish, with features like shot management, version control, review and approval tools, and delivery options.


Nuke Studio also has a 3D system, which allows you to import and export 3D geometry, cameras, lights, and shaders. You can also create 3D elements from scratch using Nuke Studio's built-in primitives, modifiers, and deformers. You can render your 3D scenes using the Scanline or Raytrace renderers, or use the Hydra node to use other renderers. You can also project 2D images onto 3D surfaces, or use the Deep compositing workflow to work with volumetric data.


Here are some of the terms that you will encounter when using Nuke Studio:


  • Project: A collection of files and settings that define your work. A project can contain one or more sequences, which are collections of shots.



  • Shot: A single piece of footage that you want to edit or composite. A shot can contain one or more tracks, which are layers of video or audio.



  • Node Graph: The workspace where you create and edit your nodes. You can access the node graph by clicking on the Node Graph tab at the bottom of the screen.



  • Node: A unit of functionality that performs a specific task on an image or a 3D element. Nodes have inputs and outputs that can be connected to other nodes using pipes.



  • Pipe: A connection between nodes that carries data from one node to another. Pipes can be color-coded to indicate the type of data they carry, such as red for image data, green for mask data, blue for 3D data, etc.



  • Viewer: The window where you can preview your work. You can access the viewer by clicking on the Viewer tab at the bottom of the screen.



  • Properties Panel: The panel where you can adjust the parameters and settings of a node. You can access the properties panel by selecting a node and pressing P on your keyboard.



  • Toolbar: The panel where you can access various tools and commands for working with nodes. You can access the toolbar by clicking on the Toolbar tab at the bottom of the screen.



  • Timeline Editor: The workspace where you edit your footage, add transitions, audio tracks, color correction, and more. You can access the timeline editor by clicking on the Timeline tab at the bottom of the screen.



  • Bin: The panel where you can store and organize your media files, such as images, videos, audio clips, etc. You can access the bin by clicking on the Bin tab at the bottom of the screen.



User Interface and Navigation




Nuke Studio has a user interface that consists of several panels and tabs that you can customize according to your preferences. Here is a screenshot of the default layout of Nuke Studio:



You can resize, rearrange, dock, undock, or close any panel or tab by dragging its title bar or using the menu options. You can also save and load different layouts using the Layout menu at the top of the screen.


You can also use various keyboard and mouse shortcuts to navigate and interact with the user interface. Here are some of the common shortcuts that you can use:


  • Spacebar: Switch between the node graph and the timeline editor.



  • Tab: Open the node menu and search for a node by name.



  • P: Open the properties panel for the selected node.



  • S: Open the settings panel for the project, sequence, or shot.



  • A: Fit the node graph or the timeline editor to the screen.



  • Z: Zoom in or out of the node graph or the timeline editor.



  • X: Center the node graph or the timeline editor on the cursor position.



  • Middle Mouse Button: Pan the node graph or the timeline editor.



  • Left Mouse Button: Select a node, a pipe, a track, or a clip.



  • Right Mouse Button: Open the context menu for a node, a pipe, a track, or a clip.



  • Ctrl/Cmd + Left Mouse Button: Add or remove a node, a pipe, a track, or a clip from the selection.



  • Shift + Left Mouse Button: Select multiple nodes, pipes, tracks, or clips in a rectangular area.



  • Ctrl/Cmd + C: Copy the selected nodes, pipes, tracks, or clips.



  • Ctrl/Cmd + V: Paste the copied nodes, pipes, tracks, or clips.



  • Ctrl/Cmd + X: Cut the selected nodes, pipes, tracks, or clips.



  • Ctrl/Cmd + Z: Undo the last action.



  • Ctrl/Cmd + Y: Redo the last action.



  • Ctrl/Cmd + S: Save the project.



Creating and Editing Nodes




To create and edit your visual effects, you need to work with nodes in the node graph. Here are some of the steps to create and edit nodes:


  • To create a node, press Tab on your keyboard and type the name of the node that you want to create. Alternatively, you can use the toolbar to select a category and then drag and drop a node from the list.



  • To connect nodes, drag a pipe from an output of one node to an input of another node. You can also use the B key to automatically connect nodes based on their types. To disconnect nodes, drag a pipe away from an input or an output.



  • To edit a node, select it and press P on your keyboard to open its properties panel. You can then adjust its parameters and settings using sliders, buttons, checkboxes, color pickers, etc. You can also use expressions to link parameters to other values or functions.



  • To view a node's output in the viewer, select it and press 1 on your keyboard. You can also use 2 to view another node's output in a split-screen mode. To switch between different views in the viewer, use V on your keyboard. To toggle between full-screen and normal mode in the viewer, use F11 on your keyboard.



  • To group nodes into a subgraph, select them and press Ctrl/Cmd + G on your keyboard. This will create a group node that contains all the selected nodes inside it. You can then rename the group node and open it by double-clicking on it. You can also add inputs and outputs to the group node to connect it to other nodes outside the group.



  • To reuse nodes in other projects, you can save them as gizmos, toolsets, or presets. Gizmos are custom nodes that you can create by saving a group node as a .gizmo file. Toolsets are collections of nodes that you can save as a .nk file and load into any project. Presets are sets of parameters that you can save for a specific node and apply to other instances of the same node.



Rendering and Exporting Projects




Once you have finished creating and editing your visual effects, you need to render and export your projects to share them with others or use them in other applications. Here are some of the steps to render and export your projects:


  • To render your project, you need to create a write node that specifies the output file format, location, name, and settings. You can create a write node by pressing W on your keyboard or using the toolbar. You can also use the Render menu to access various render options and settings.



  • To export your project, you need to create an export node that specifies the output file format, location, name, and settings. You can create an export node by pressing E on your keyboard or using the toolbar. You can also use the Export menu to access various export options and settings.



  • To render or export your project, you need to select the write node or the export node and press Ctrl/Cmd + R on your keyboard or use the Render or Export menu. This will open the Render Queue panel, where you can see the progress and status of your render or export tasks. You can also pause, resume, cancel, or reorder your tasks in the Render Queue panel.



  • Once your render or export task is done, you can find your output file in the location that you specified in the write node or the export node. You can then view, share, or use your output file as you wish.



Tips and Tricks for Nuke Studio Users




Nuke Studio is a powerful and versatile software that offers many possibilities for creating and editing visual effects. However, it can also be challenging and complex to master. Here are some tips and tricks that can help you improve your skills and workflow in Nuke Studio:


Keyboard Shortcuts




One of the best ways to speed up your work in Nuke Studio is to use keyboard shortcuts for common tasks and commands. Keyboard shortcuts can save you time and effort by reducing the number of mouse clicks and movements that you need to make. Here are some of the keyboard shortcuts that you should memorize and use frequently:


  • Spacebar: Switch between the node graph and the timeline editor.



  • Tab: Open the node menu and search for a node by name.



  • P: Open the properties panel for the selected node.



  • S: Open the settings panel for the project, sequence, or shot.



  • A: Fit the node graph or the timeline editor to the screen.



  • Z: Zoom in or out of the node graph or the timeline editor.



  • X: Center the node graph or the timeline editor on the cursor position.



Middle Mouse Button: Pan the node graph or the


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